Table of Contents

Introduction

Jewish Esoteric Moralization (JEM) pops up in surprising places, including Jewish adaptations of non-Jewish works. In fact, Jews may be more likely to adapt stories that are perceived to be anti-Semitic, whereas the natural inclination would be to stymie or invert the subtext. Such a transformation is particularly well illustrated in Blade Runner, the film based on Philip K. Dick’s classic sci-fi novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (abbrev. Electric Sheep).

Note that where JEM is based on existing stories (i.e. where names and other details are retained from the source material), the symbolism may be rendered imperfectly as a result. In such cases we may still detect the hand of the esotericist while allowing for some degree of inconsistency. As JEM analysis is not an exact science your mileage may vary; I encourage you to compare notes with me.

We’ll begin with an overview of Electric Sheep‘s subtext before applying Roman Interpretation to Blade Runner through the lens of Mark Brahmin’s Racial Esoteric Moralization. The reader should be familiar with the film, and with Brahmin’s thesis which can be studied at The Apollonian Transmission (and in his upcoming books). In particular, one should be aware of the practice of god-masking and the mutability of gods.


Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? as anti-Semitic allegory

Prior to writing Electric Sheep, Dick wrote The Man in the High Castle (1962). It’s a work of speculative fiction where the Axis defeated the Allies in the Second World War and divide America à la post-war Germany. It seems Dick’s fascination with the subject wormed its way into Electric Sheep (published in ’68); both are set mainly in San Francisco and background the colonization of other planets. Where they differ is that Electric Sheep camouflages its themes with a beguiling science-fiction setting. This distances us from the Second World War, such that we unhesitatingly slip on the boots of (what is essentially) an SS officer.

Following World War Terminus, the Earth is so polluted by radioactive fallout that humanity is forced to colonize other planets to ensure its long-term survival. We can think of these extraterrestrial colonies as the Lebensraum that Hitler wanted to procure for Germany. The bulk of the colonization work is carried out by a new slave underclass of genetically engineered humans called “androids.” In this reading, they personify European Jews who were treated as second-class citizens and put to work in slave labor camps by the German National Socialists.

Some androids manage to escape captivity and seek refuge back on Earth, where androids are verboten but easily blend in among people. They are the Jews who miraculously escaped the ghettos/camps and disappeared among native Europeans. Just as some Jews were sheltered from the authorities by so-called “Righteous Gentiles,” a man named John Isidore tries to do the same for a group of escaped androids (here Dick may be specifically referencing Isidore of Seville). And like Jews, the androids closely resemble one another. This is true to some extent of all races, of course, but is observably exaggerated among Ashkenazi Jews as supported by genetic studies.[1]

Some androids manage to infiltrate government agencies, posing a threat akin to Jewish spies and saboteurs in the Third Reich. Bounty hunters like our protagonist Rick Deckard are the SS officers or Gestapo agents tasked with hunting them down. A major clue is that his wife, Iran, has a name etymologically linked to “Aryan” (indeed, Iran means “Land of the Aryans”). Yet unlike typical two-dimensional Hollywood “Nazis,” Deckard is not pure evil: He’s disgusted by a fellow bounty hunter whose motto is “sleep with them before you kill them.”[2] And, like most German officers in the Reich – the majority being devout Christians – religion plays a role in his life.

A new-age religion called “Mercerism,” named for its Sisyphean messiah Wilbur Mercer, is a placeholder for Christianity: Mercerism enshrines empathy for all living creatures as the highest moral imperative, as most species have gone extinct due to the war. Adherents attend “church” via an “empathy box,” which generates a virtual reality-like experience of Mercer’s struggle. However, Mercer’s empathy does not extend to androids, no matter how human they might appear.

Just as Jews reject Jesus as their messiah and demonstrate animosity towards Christianity, the androids have no faith in Mercer. They’re legally barred from interfacing with him and cannot “convert.” When the television personality Buster Friendly “exposes” Mercerism as an elaborate hoax, the android Roy Baty and his wife Irmgard express they’d had their doubts. From their point of view, Mercerism and empathy are lies humans tell themselves to feel superior to androids. It’s implied that Buster and his cast of cronies are androids, hence they’re stand-ins for the Jewish media monopoly that regularly takes pot shots at Christianity. Despite Buster’s revelation, Deckard’s faith only intensifies; accordingly, Dick implies that Christianity fills a hole in people’s lives regardless of its veracity.

In contrast to humans the androids are incapable of empathy, even for one another. They admit this, and at one point commit the grave sin of torturing a spider for fun (perhaps Dick’s way of criticizing Jewish and/or Allied behavior during and after the war).[3] Thus, an empathy test – which measures minute physiological responses that only humans are capable of – becomes the primary method of identifying androids. This is the “Voigt-Kampff” test, which has a German name for obvious reasons.

In hunting some escaped Nexus-6 androids – the latest and most perfect imitations yet – Deckard is ordered to test some in person at their manufacturer, the Rosen Association. The name “Rosen” is a German/Jewish Ashkenazic surname, which is another important clue to the subtext. It turns out the company is waging an arms race against humanity as it attempts to design more perfect imitations, which are described as Caucasian in appearance. Dick appears to be commenting on the myriad forms of Jewish crypsis, while hinting that the humans of the future (Germans) want their androids to match the Aryan ideal.

The Rosen Association’s president and his niece Rachael (the latter another Hebrew name) personify the Jewish middlemen tasked with maintaining the ghettos/camps in the Third Reich, and they do so for profit. As to be expected of the Jewish Ghetto Police or camp kapo, the Rosen Association’s loyalties lie with the androids.

Initially, the Rosens fool Deckard into thinking the Voigt-Kampff is faulty in the hopes of abolishing bounty hunting permanently. The subplot calls into question the rudimentary tests used by German officers to identify and segregate Jews from the wider European population: Just as facial measurement tests might produce false-positives, humans are concerned that the Voigt-Kampff might incorrectly identify people with a flat affect as androids, resulting in their deaths.

Anthropometry was used to determine race under the Third Reich’s Nuremberg Laws. Prior to the Second World War, eugenics was a socially acceptable subject of research throughout the Western world. Credit: Universal History Archive Getty Images

When Deckard realizes the Rosens nearly outwitted him, he describes the corporation as “possessing a sort of group mind,” and that “his mistake (. . .) had been viewing them as individuals.”[4] This is perhaps the most biting commentary in the book; it implies Jews conceal an unflagging ethnocentrism under a veneer of individualism. Of course Jews have often been accused of having a hive mind, where most conflicts between them can be reduced to disagreements about “what is best for the Jews.” Thus, Dick seems to be advising his readers to err on the side of caution and never give them the benefit of the doubt.

Once the Rosens’ ruse has been uncovered they attempt to bribe Deckard, and when that fails Rachael attempts to seduce him. No bounty hunter has retired another android after having slept with her, or so she claims. She’s essentially a Jewish spy tasked with sexually compromising German agents (something of an Esther type). Alternatively, she personifies the imprisoned Jewish women who tried to win their freedom or favors by seducing German officers. She puts his loyalties to the ultimate test: “Some female androids seemed to (Deckard) pretty; he had found himself physically attracted by several, and it was an odd sensation, knowing intellectually that they were machines, but emotionally reacting anyhow.”[5] No doubt a similarly strange feeling came over German officers dealing with Jewish women.

Deckard tracks down the android opera singer Miss Luba Luft, but she turns the tables by calling the cops on him! He’s arrested by a parallel police force that he didn’t know existed. Here Dick plays on the mutual distrust between German officers of competing factions (i.e. the SA, Gestapo, and SS). Much to his surprise, the station’s police chief is one of Luft’s accomplices. Meanwhile, an officer named Phil Resch is paranoid that he’s an android with implanted memories. Dick uses these characters to explore Jewish subterfuge and the identity crisis facing German officers who possessed (or might possess) Jewish roots. Here, perhaps, “Phil” is an author surrogate.

Deckard and Resch return to the opera house where the latter executes Luft. The Russian name “Luba” and German word “Luft” hints that she was a Soviet Jewess masquerading in Germany under a false name (e.g. the reverse of Lev Bronstein becoming Leon Trotsky). Similarly, the android Sandor Kadalyi takes the name Max Polokov. Note that “Sandor Kadalyi” appears to be an anagram for “a.k.a. sly android.” Another solution is “yids load an ark,” possibly referring to the state of Israel (other words found in the name include “Alaska” and “Adonis” which find purchase in Blade Runner).

Dick even implies that Jews don’t want to work or build anything themselves, preferring instead to settle among established nations. The androids admit: “We came back (to Earth) because nobody should have to live (on Mars). It wasn’t conceived for habitation, at least not within the last billion years. It’s so old. You feel it in the stones, the terrible old age.”[6] Alternatively, this could describe the Jewish diaspora’s refusal to make aliyah given the harsh climate and desert conditions in Israel when compared with the creature comforts of Europe and the New World.

Despite Rachael’s best efforts, Deckard successfully retires all of the escaped Nexus-6 androids. She responds by killing his new (and expensive) goat in a petty act of revenge. In discussing this, Brahmin suggested the electric sheep and goat could be related to the story of the scapegoat in Leviticus, or to Matthew 25:31-46, the Sheep and the Goats. Humorously enough, because of the absence of a coherent shared symbol language, intention among goyishe artists can be harder to read.

If Dick is referencing the scapegoat, he may be mocking the accusation that Hitler scapegoated the Jews. Rachael’s killing of the goat suggests that scapegoating is a Jewish tactic. What’s more, in context, the implication is that the Jews scapegoated Germany as a whole. The Judeo-Bolsheviks were responsible for killing millions of Russians and Ukrainians before and after Hitler came to power, and National Socialism was – if anything – a reaction to the growing Communist threat. Thus international Jewry had every motivation to project its crimes onto Germany, as was attempted with the Katyn Massacre.

In the New Testament parable, those who do good deeds are “sheep” that go to heaven while those who reject Christ’s message are “goats” sent to hell. Rachael’s killing of the goat is self-destructive, for she is herself a “goat” according to the parable. On top of that, Deckard’s desire to care for a real animal rather than an electric sheep reveals his desire for true salvation; his purchase of the goat may prove his empathy for non-Christians as described by the parable. Alternatively, the purchase of a goat over a sheep may suggest an urge to reject the Christian “lamb” for something more authentic and “wild,” such as paganism, which aligns with the National Socialists incorporating pagan symbols into the Reich’s imagery.

In summation, Electric Sheep is a religiously-tinged allegory of the German-Jewish conflict during the Second World War. Note the “Germans” aren’t exterminating the “Jews” but put them to slave labor; this is closer to the truth than Jewish historians would like to admit. In 1968, the “Holocaust” had to yet to enter the vernacular, with the television mini-series still a decade away. Dick seems to sympathize with the Germans, likely due to their abhorrent treatment following the war, though his prose is not so artless that one can easily pin him down as anti-Semitic. Is he condemning the Jews by implying that those who lack empathy deserve none in return? Or is he criticizing Christianity and its message of love and tolerance as a farce, given the treatment of the Jews under the “Christian” Third Reich? Perhaps it’s a bit of both.


Blade Runner as Jewish Esoteric Moralization

We can be sure that Jews – adept at sniffing out even the faintest whiff of anti-Semitism – would have recognized Electric Sheep‘s subtext (especially following The Man in the High Castle). Thus we can assume it would have been a top priority to subvert its themes. Coincidentally, Electric Sheep was first optioned by the Jew Herb Jaffe, who pitched the story as a comedy in a likely attempt to neutralize its subtext. Dick put the kibosh on Jaffe’s screenplay, forcing the project into limbo for several years. Three of the four production companies that funded the final film were headed by Jews: Filmways, Inc. (the Ransohoff family); the Ladd Company (Jay Kanter); and Tandem Productions (Bud Yorkin, Norman Lear). As it was revived through this chain of investors and rewrites he was largely kept out of the loop.

Hampton Fancher wrote the first working screenplay. It’s unclear if he is Jewish but it was his script that changed “Rosen” to “Tyrell,” which Jewish critics note is “a case of whitewashing or a concerted attempt to de-Judaize the evil capitalists.”[7] Fancher (or the Jewish producers) introduced a number of other changes that are highly meaningful with regards to JEM. Some of these changes were the work of David Webb Peoples, a Jew hired to rework Fancher’s script. It’s also possible that Ridley Scott had a hand in the film’s symbolism.[8]

Even a casual analysis of Blade Runner reveals Biblical and mythological associations have been grafted onto Dick’s characters. Among these we find multiple name changes, and blatant name drops including Methusaleh, Salome, Lilith, and (Saint) Sebastian. Others, such as the introduction of a replicant named Zhora, can be as revealing as Dick’s “Iran.” Though it may initially seem like a tangled mess, in most cases the associations flow into one another in the manner established by mythographers. As such it’s something of an education in the evolution of world mythology or, as Brahmin puts it, Promethean Transmission.

The visual effects team refer to this opening shot as the “Hades landscape.” Perhaps the Greco-Roman references were a subject of discussion on set?

Most importantly, Brahmin’s framework reveals that Blade Runner has inverted the esoteric racial identities of Electric Sheep‘s characters: Deckard is now a Semitic cipher hunting Aryan replicants! The story encodes Semitic bride gathering as a central theme and operates as a rebuttal of the novel’s religious subtext, hewing closely to Brahmin’s thesis when properly understood.

The bride gathering element should be self-evident given Deckard’s arc has completely changed. Whereas before he was a married man and his primary goal was to earn enough money for an animal that he and his wife could bond over, now he’s a depressed bachelor. The story ends with him absconding with Rachael, who has been recast as a delicate virgin (i.e. the Semitic hero wins the day by taking an Aryan lover).

The film refutes Dick’s appraisal of Christianity through Roy Batty’s new arc, in which he becomes obsessed with his own mortality. As mentioned, in Electric Sheep Deckard’s unwavering faith implies that Christians would believe in Jesus even if he was a proven fraud because his message of love and empathy ring true. In contrast Blade Runner ditches Mercerism entirely, and reproaches the faithful as soothing their fear of death by deluding themselves with fantasies of an afterlife. This is clearly communicated when Roy takes on a Christ-like posture and is thereby pacified in the finale. This level-headed critique of religious faith aligns with studies showing that religiosity varies depending on mortality salience.

Whereas the novel impugns the Jewish character, Blade Runner ostensibly venerates Christianity. Roy saves Deckard’s life because of his newfound Christian morality (nothing like this occurs in the novel). Presumably Roy could even pass the Voight-Kampff! In some sense the screenwriters are asserting their moral superiority while patting themselves on the back for bringing out the best in the goyim. Of course the notion that “there is no difference between the Jew and the Greek,” or that one should “turn the other cheek” to one’s enemies are precisely the sort of lessons that have allowed Jews to dominate us. Roy’s parting words, “time to die,” round out his demoralizing arc.

When viewed as a microcosm Blade Runner depicts the religious conversion of the Ancient Roman/Aryan world. Jupiter, unlike Jesus Christ, does not promise salvation and immortality when his creation comes knocking. Disappointed by the natural order of things, and having lost faith in the cult of Jupiter, Roy kills his own god in favor of a foreign one. Hence Roy is a prototypical Roman (i.e. Aryan) who converts to Christianity after having bought hook, line, and sinker its promises of rewards to come. The subtext is a Jewish victory lap for having supplanted the Greco-Roman pantheon with their cult of Christianity, not unlike that discussed in my analyses of the films Deep Impact and Tron: Legacy.

Just as Roy has seen things people wouldn’t believe, it is difficult for most Europeans to begin to imagine life in the pre-Christian era. We can only speculate what was discovered and lost by the ancients (if not outright suppressed by Christianity). This, I believe, is the subtext of Roy’s poignant soliloquy in which he reminisces only to mourn that “all these moments will fade in time like tears in rain.” The implication being that Christianity purged the Aryan’s collective memory (at times by the sword). In contrast the Jew fanatically records and embellishes his own history, including – if not especially! – the crimes committed against him.

When Roy dies, he releases a dove symbolizing his attainment of inner peace, or his spirit ascending to Heaven. Esoterically it also symbolizes the loss of his consorts Aphrodite (Pris) and Venus (Zhora) – for whom the dove is an important symbol, as discussed in the character analysis. These women could have given Roy children, descendants being the next best thing to immortality. In other words, Roy had what he was searching for all along but let it slip through his fingers. The film’s last lines, “Too bad she won’t live. But then again, who does?” underscores the pragmatic and sober attitude towards life and death that pervades the JEM. The lesson being that one should live this life to the fullest; focus on having children and raising a family rather than succumbing to fantasies of heavenly rewards.


The significance of numbers in Blade Runner

Dick may have assigned the number six to his androids in reference to the mystical six million Jewish victims of Hitler’s regime. Here we begin to understand why a Jewish esotericist might find Electric Sheep a good candidate for adaptation: When viewed through the lens of Jewish symbolism, Dick has unintentionally contradicted himself by applying Aryan numbers to his Jewish ciphers.[9] Consequently, Blade Runner needn’t alter the Nexus’ model number to invert their racial identity.

Six may also represent the Aryan as a solar resource, thus the Nexus-6 slaves gel with the Jewish worldview that the goyim were created to serve them.[10] Errors like this are one of the reasons why Brahmin argues we need an agreed upon, shared symbolism.

The screenwriters emphasize the Aryan nature of the replicants via repetition of the number: We’re informed that Leon had been working at the Tyrell Corporation for six days before Holden tests him; and Roy interrupts Tyrell in the midst of buying or selling “sixty-six thousand” stocks.

Note that the sequel Blade Runner 2049 retcons Rachael as a Nexus-7 (Fancher’s invention). Ostensibly she’s been redefined as a uniquely advanced model replicant, but Brahmin’s study reveals that the number seven is the most important number in Judaism, so it raises some suspicion.[11] In accordance with the JEM number symbolism seven would presumably define her as a Semitic cipher, or perhaps an especially lucky match for a Semitic male. The latter interpretation relates to the Biblical Rachel, discussed in the character analysis.

Another “happy accident” for the filmmakers is the androids’ four year lifespan. The number four gained symbolic significance through its association with Enki, an Aryan Sea God central to ancient flood myths. Writes Brahmin: “During the second millennium BC, Enki was sometimes referred to by the numeric ideogram for ’40’, a ‘sacred number.’”[12] Thus it rained for forty days and forty nights in Genesis. Note that adding or subtracting zeroes does not change a number’s symbolic meaning, so 4, 40, 400, and so on are all aqueous symbols. Moreover “water, especially freshwater, (is) a symbol that commonly indicates Aryan blood” in the JEM.[13] Hence the replicants’ four year lifespan is consistent with the Aryan lifeblood.[14]

Lastly, Blade Runner appears to encode Hebraic gematria in numbers exceeding twelve (e.g. 995, seen on the side of the spinner vehicle, coincides with a Hebrew word meaning “the sanctuaries of Israel”). Gematria is an aspect of Jewish mysticism and encryption that falls outside Brahmin’s study, partly because its interpretation is highly speculative. Those interested may want to investigate the numbers in the film for themselves using Bill Heidrick’s gematria website to see what connections might be there.


Blade Runner character analysis

Rick Deckard

“Rick” is cognate with Dick, so our protagonist may be something of an author surrogate in Electric Sheep. However, his given name goes unmentioned in Blade Runner (Bryant refers to him as “Deck” for short). Its absence may be explained by its ambiguity: Brahmin advises that “Rick” may function as a Semitic identifier due to its phallic connotations,[15] or as an Aryan identifier in line with the Consumption motif (from its association with the word hayrick). Thus the filmmakers may have avoided it so as not to muddy Deckard’s new Semitic identity.

As for the surname Deckard, Dick allegedly chose it in relation to the French philosopher Descartes, famous for his statement: Cogito ergo sum (“I think, therefore I am”).[16] Obviously that and Descartes’ mechanistic worldview relate to the question of what it means to be human vis-à-vis androids. Given Descartes’ low opinion of animals and Electric Sheep‘s emphasis on empathy, Dick seems to be saying the line ought to be: “I think and feel, therefore I am.” (In the film Pris parrots this line to Sebastian.) In fact “Descartes” literally means “dweller at the outskirts of town.” This is useful as it may describe Deckard as the stereotypical Jewish outsider vis-à-vis an Aryan populace.

As most of the characters in Blade Runner possess connections to Greco-Roman deities, I suspect the writers delighted in a more esoteric reading of the surname: In the ancient world Saturn was the most distant planet yet discovered, thus in celestial terms it was the “dweller at the outskirts of town.” Indeed Tacitus suggests that Jews worshipped Saturn specifically because of its perceived “highest orbit,” which they interpreted as Saturn’s dominion over all other gods.[17]

Deckard’s occupation and conflict with Roy also tie him to Saturn/Cronus: To wit, he’s the personification of death, Father Time, or the Grim Reaper coming to collect his dues. Note that Father Time and the Grim Reaper are often conflated with Saturn as Reaper,[18] and that the film’s new term for bounty hunters may describe these figures cutting down lives with a scythe. Indeed upon retiring Zhora, Deckard is described as a “one man slaughterhouse.”

Furthermore Scott famously suggested that Deckard is himself a replicant; as a replicant killing other replicants, he becomes Saturn eating his children. Obviously I’m not suggesting that Scott is to be trusted on that point, so take it with a grain of salt. Yet Deckard is rendered speechless upon Roy’s death; his empathy mirrors that of Saturn as the “patron of cripples” (Saturn gained this designation in the Medieval period, where he is often depicted with a peg leg). Moreover, his hesitance to take on the assignment and his reaction to Roy’s death aligns with Brahmin’s concept of the “Melancholy of the Shohet.” Thus Deckard may be recast as a god-masked Saturn/Cronus, one personification of the Jewish god and people.[19]

As a blade runner Deckard can be interpreted as the Grim Reaper, Father Time, and/or a god-masked Saturn/Cronus.

… as Semitic serpent

Putting that aside, we may infer that Deckard is a Semitic cipher from his repeated juxtaposition with dragons and snakes in combination with other contextual clues. These are used interchangeably in the JEM as symbolic synonyms of the serpent in the Garden of Eden, the Vine of Bacchus, and the Vine of Judah. In short, they represent the Jewish deity and by extension Jewry. None of the following details originated in Electric Sheep, so we can be fairly confident they’re examples of the Serpent motif encoded by the filmmakers.[20]

Early in the film Deckard eats at the “White Dragon” noodle bar, topped by a large neon sign of an Oriental dragon. This is, in part, a reference to the white dragon of Arthurian Legend,[21] where we find a quest for the Holy Grail that grants immortality. Clearly this relates to Roy’s quest for an extended life, and to Deckard’s conquest of Rachael as a rejuvenating, eugenic resource. Perhaps the “white dragon” here also implies that Deckard is a Semite of Aryan appearance or a crypto-Jew.

Deckard eats at the “White Dragon” noodle bar, esoterically alluding to the white dragon of Arthurian Legend and by extension the Grail quest.

Deckard finds an important clue in the form of an artificial snake scale left in a bath tub by Zhora. The snake scale, deposited onto her body by an artificial snake, has been metaphorically “shed” in the shower in the manner a snake sheds its skin. The ancients believed the snake’s unusual ability to shed its skin meant they were immortal.

An early example of this is the serpent in the Epic of Gilgamesh.[22] Like Roy, Gilgamesh goes on a quest to obtain immortality. He finds an underwater plant that can rejuvenate him, but before he can use it it’s stolen by a serpent which leaves behind its skin (indicating that it had eaten the magical plant and was reborn). Deckard effectively becomes this thieving serpent – a synonym of the seducing serpent in the Garden of Eden – when he scores with Rachael.

Deckard finds artificial snake scales in the bath tub of the hotel room, metaphorically “shed” by Zhora when she took a shower.

Tracing the scale’s maker’s mark to an animal market, Deckard interrogates an Egyptian man who specializes in making the snakes. His ethnicity and snake-related occupation alludes to the Ouroboros – the snake eating its own tail – an important Egyptian symbol associated with the world serpent, eternity, and immortality later adopted by Alchemists.[23] This further emphasizes the film’s themes.

Deckard interrogates the snake maker to learn Zhora’s whereabouts. Here we see blue and yellow neon signs reflected in the storefront window; Aryan colors per JEM symbolism.

 

Deckard finds Zhora at “The Snake Pit” strip club, and ends up chasing her out into the streets where he retires her. As he stands over her dead body we see another serpent symbol above him, this time a neon sign in the shape of a green Chinese dragon (green is a Semitic identifier in the JEM color symbolism).[24] We also see female mannequins nearby with snake-like tubes coiling around them. As mentioned, these tubes may equally represent a parasitic vine.[25] And there’s another dragon in the form of a statue at the street side bar where Deckard stops for a drink following the killing; random prop, or more esoteric symbolism?

Deckard is juxtaposed with a neon sign of a green dragon when he kills Zhora. He then gets a drink at a bar which features another dragon prop.

Eldon Tyrell

As mentioned, Fancher’s script renames Rosen to Tyrell in a clear attempt to distance the character from his implied Jewish ancestry. “Tyrell” is believed to derive from the Old French tirel from the verb tirer meaning “to pull.” Possibly this suggests that Tyrell is a puppeteer pulling the strings of his replicants by giving them false memories. More likely, Brahmin suggests the name is a reference to Tyr – the Aryan God of War in Norse myth – who is associated with both Jupiter and Mars. The latter half of the name sounds like El, a generic Semitic word for god. Indeed, contextual clues imply that Tyrell is a god-masked Zeus/Jupiter, an Aryan god.

The first clue is that one of the escaped replicants was electrocuted while trying to infiltrate the Tyrell Corporation’s headquarters (Zeus/Jupiter is associated with lightning and therefore electrocution). The second clue is a pair of eagle statues marking the entrance to the meeting room where Deckard tests Rachael. Another eagle statue sits over Tyrell’s shoulder in his bedroom (the eagle is Zeus/Jupiter’s sacred animal). More clues appear when examining other characters.

A pair of eagle statues guard the Tyrell Corporation meeting room. Another eagle statue seems perched on Tyrell’s shoulder in his bedroom. The eagle is Zeus/Jupiter’s sacred animal.

The name “Eldon” is itself an English habitational name for someone who lived on a “sacred hill.” In context, this could be taken to mean Mount Zion or Mount Olympus. Indeed the Tyrell Corporation headquarters resemble a hill, mountain, ziggurat, or pyramid. Fancher likely kept the name because it implies Tyrell’s godliness: As mentioned “El” means god, and “Don” or “Donald” means “world ruler” or “world wielder.”

Rachael

Dick likely thought that a common Jewish name like “Rachel” was appropriate for his Jewish vixen, yet Brahmin’s study reveals that the Biblical Rachel is understood to be Aryan by Jewish esotericists! There she is Jacob’s more beautiful second wife following his marriage to the “unloved” and “hated” Semitic Leah.[26] In Blade Runner, Rachael effectively becomes Deckard’s second wife, as his first wife (Iran) is mysteriously absent. Alternatively Rachael becomes Iran, his “Aryan” wife.

“Rachel” literally means “ewe” (female sheep) in Hebrew, so characters bearing this name in the JEM often personify desirable females to be poached from the Aryan flock.[27] Naturally Fancher retains the name, but transforms Dick’s backstabbing Jewish femme fatale into a delicate, virginal, Aryan flower to be plucked by Deckard. She no longer tries to deceive him or prevent him from doing his job, at one point retiring one of the runaways herself!

Notably the Biblical Jacob had to wait seven years before he could marry Rachel, which gels with our Rachael being a Nexus-7 if we go with the sequel’s retcon. And in keeping with an important strategy of the bride gathering cult, Deckard is a “neg-ing” Jewish suitor who initially mocks Rachael for believing her implanted memories are real.[28] In effect, he is the Jewish husband converting his Christian wife to Judaism, having convinced her that her most cherished beliefs are false. This does not occur in the novel, where she knows she is an android.

Left: Rachael wears a big fluffy jacket, her “wool” as a female sheep. Right: Rachel’s blouse features a floral pattern typically worn by fertile, young, Aryan women open to admixture in the JEM plant symbolism.

… as Eve and Psyche

Peoples’ script inserts a wrinkle into Rachael’s backstory that is highly revealing: We learn that Rachael’s implanted memories once belonged to Tyrell’s deceased niece “Lilith.” This is a bald-faced reference to the Biblical Lilith whom Adam rejects in the Garden of Eden. As “Lilith’s replacement” Rachael is conflated with Eve, Adam’s more beautiful and compatible second wife. Yet Adam is an Aryan figure cuckolded by the serpent,[29] hence Rachael-as-Eve is seduced by Deckard-as-serpent.

Eve, as a figure, is also conflated with Psyche. Writes Brahmin:

“The Hebrew word for Eve, ‘Chavah,’ חַוָּה is often thought derived from the closely related hayah, הָוָה, which means ‘to breathe’ in the ancient Hebrew. This might make Eve a reference to the clearly Aryan figure of Psyche whose name means ‘Soul’ or ‘Breath of Life.’ Likewise Chavah is considered related to chayah, חיה, on the premise the latter means ‘to live.’”[30]

… as Athena/Minerva

Brahmin also reminds us that the “breath of life” or “pneuma” of Psyche is mirrored in the animating breath of Minerva.[31] Indeed Rachael can be understood as a god-masked Athena/Minerva, as she’s the “daughter” of Tyrell-as-Zeus. Corroborating this reading is the presence of an owl during her introduction, a bird associated with the goddess (granted, an owl is also present in this scene in Electric Sheep, so it may simply be another gift that Dick accidentally dropped in Blade Runner‘s lap). It’s an advantageous detail given the subtext:

Recall that Minerva/Athena was “born” when the Aryan Zeus/Jupiter had a headache and the Semitic Hephaestus/Vulcan split his head open, freeing her. This correlates with Tyrell creating Rachael, who is then “extracted” from him by the Semitic Deckard.[32] Pertinently, the man who actually helped Tyrell “birth” Rachael (and the other replicants) is in fact the geneticist J.F. Sebastian (see Sebastian as Hephaestus/Vulcan, below).

“Do you like our owl?” purrs Rachael as Deckard enters the room. Note the art deco pattern on the walls in this room may represent the skyward-facing Aryan half of the interlocking triangles of the Star of David, symbolism mirrored in the conjoining of the upward-pointing compass and the downward-pointing square in Masonic imagery.

Roy Batty

Whereas Roy is simply referred to as the “leader” of the android escapees in Electric Sheep and is not particularly well-defined or charismatic, in Blade Runner he becomes a highly sophisticated and sympathetic character. The name “Roy Batty” appears to be a play on words meaning “crazy king,” but there’s much more here. Of course the name Roy, which may come from the French word roi (lit. “king”), is useful as names referencing nobility often identify Aryan characters in the JEM.[33] Additionally he is now listed as a “combat” model for “colonization defense” of Mars, a martial occupation further painting him as Aryan.[34]

Indeed Roy’s occupation, in combination with his flight from Mars and other details, implies that he is a god-masked Ares/Mars (an Aryan figure). Mars’ consort was Nerio or Neriene who became syncretized with Athena/Minerva. Thus Deckard’s eventual coupling with Rachael-as-Minerva further emphasizes the theme of racial cuckoldry, a central aspect of the JEM. Other clues explored below suggest Roy is a complex composite drawing from additional religious and mythical sources, but his primary identity appears to be Aryan.

Roy is identified as a “combat” model for “colony defense” of Mars in his file, suggesting that he’s a god-masked Ares/Mars.

… as the Biblical Adam or Esau

The name “Roy” is also a nickname for a person with red hair, stemming from the Gaelic ruadh (lit. “red”). Names meaning “red” or implying ruddiness are Aryan identifiers in the JEM naming convention, particularly as it relates to “Adam the Red.”[35] Hence the name suggests that, having been exiled to an off-world colony by his maker, Roy is an Aryan Adamic figure cast out of Eden by Tyrell-as-God. Likewise he is set up to be cuckolded by Deckard-as-serpent where Rachael is Eve.

This reading jives perfectly with the changes to the story. In Electric Sheep, Roy never meets with Eldon Rosen, as he’s unperturbed by his limited lifespan. Yet in Blade Runner the meeting between Roy and Tyrell couldn’t be more important. Here Roy remarks, “it’s not an easy thing to meet your maker,” underscoring that he is akin to Adam and Tyrell akin to God. Yet unlike the Christian God, Tyrell offers no hope of eternal salvation and simply advises Roy to live his life to the fullest. This is the pragmatic worldview of the ancients. Disappointed, Roy symbolically turns to Christianity in hopes of resurrection or an eternal afterlife in the finale.

As the name may refer specifically to those with red hair, it posits Roy as akin to the Aryan Esau (whose name is etymologically close to Adam and Edom), who is especially the red haired one as he is described as being covered with red hair at birth. Esau, of course, is a well known and accepted symbol of the goy while the Edomites, related to Amalek, become the hated Aryans that must be destroyed in the Jewish worldview. Note that Germans in particular are often posited as Amalekites by Jewish “scholars” as part of Israel’s twentieth-century foundation myth.

… as Dumuzid/Tammuz

Saliently, Fancher alters Roy’s surname Baty to Batty. Though the names may be interchangeable in some instances, the addition of an extra “t” can change the origin and meaning of the name. Baty – cognate with names like “Beatty” – stems from the Aramaic “Bartholomew” (which may imply the Biblical figure). In contrast “Batty” can mean “fisherman” or “boatman” where the Old English “bat” means “boat.” To the extent Batty means boat and is JEM, this may be a simple vaginal reference as boat and ark symbols appear to be vaginal symbols dating from Sumer, and emasculating goyishe characters in this manner does occur in the JEM. Alterantively, this new occupational surname may explain why Roy and the other replicants shacked up at the Yukon Hotel (a setting inserted in Blade Runner). “Yukon” comes from the Gwich’in word Yu-kun-ah which means “great river.”

It is my suspicion that the hotel is a reference to “the house (called) ‘The River Ordeal’” mentioned in Mesopotamian myth and later Israelite literature.[36] “Trial by river ordeal was a widespread phenomenon, in which the accused was plunged into the river, where his success in withstanding the rushing waters was supposed to determine his guilt or innocence.”[37] As a Christian convert Roy will certainly be judged. Here it’s worth noting that the sinuous Oriental dragons seen alongside Deckard are traditionally associated with rivers, suggesting he will do the judging.

“Yukon” comes from the Gwich’in word Yu-kun-ah which means “great river,” so the Yukon Hotel may relate to the house called “The River Ordeal.”

In the mythological subtext, the meaning of “Batty” ties Roy to the Mesopotamian Dumuzid/Tammuz who was also called “the fisherman (su – ha = bayaru), and later ‘the herdsman.’”[38] Tammuz’s flock is compared to that of the Greek Sun God Helios (cognate with Apollo) – suggesting Tammuz has stolen the Aryan’s flock – though here it simply suggests Roy shepherds an Aryan flock, as he’s the leader of the escaped replicants.[39]

As a Dying and Rising God and God of Spring who becomes a shepherd, Dumuzid/Tammuz is considered a synonym of Adonis. These Dying and Rising Gods are Semitic or proto-Jewish in origin – the Hebrew calendar even has a month named in honor of Tammuz – and they share much in common with Jesus Christ.[40] Hence we have what appears to be the first link in a chain describing Roy’s union with Semitic gods that will pacify his fear of death.

When taken together “Roy Batty” literally means “King Fisher.” This further conflates Roy with Dumuzid/Tammuz, as the latter is transformed into an allalu bird with a broken wing in tablet six of the Epic of Gilgamesh.[41] The allalu bird, belonging to a family called Coraciidae, are related to kingfishers and “share the colorful appearance of kingfishers and bee-eaters.”[42] Thus on some level the bird set free in the finale may symbolize Roy’s transformation into this allalu bird.

And like Dumuzid, Roy is a man with no children; tragically, his genetic legacy dies with him. In Dumuzid and Ĝeštin-ana 33-46,[43] we learn that Dumuzid is a man “who has not fulfilled those days and years” because he has no wife, no children, no friend, and no companion. As such Roy-as-Dumuzid has failed to live his life to the fullest as per Tyrell’s advice. For this reason, Dumuzid’s sister Ĝeštin-ana describes her brother as “the lad who is not a comfort to his mother,” presumably because he has provided her no grandchildren. Ĝeštin-ana’s “lament of misfortune” relates to Roy’s death before he can pass on his genes – a fate Deckard seeks to avoid with Rachael.

… as “King Mad” or Apollo Lycegenes

In the climax it seems Roy is going insane when he howls like a wolf and engages in a game of cat-and-mouse with Deckard. The wolf howling was added by Peoples, and fits a surface-level reading of “Roy Batty” as “king mad” or “king insane.”[44] As wolves howl at the Moon, this may relate to the lunacy caused by the Moon or the Moon God Sin.

However, the wolf howling also dovetails with Brahmin’s observation that the wolf is an animal totem projected onto the Aryan in the JEM.[45] This is seen most clearly in the Biblical Benjamin (the ravening wolf), as well as with the epithet Apollo Lycegenes (lit. “born of a wolf”). Apollo in particular is understood to be Jewry’s archnemesis, hence Roy may personify Apollo Lycegenes in his duel with Deckard. This could be hinted at when Tyrell tells Roy that he “burns brightest” (i.e., like the Sun God Apollo). Alternatively, the wolf howling serves as a reminder that Roy is an Aryan figure despite taking on the posture of a Dying and Rising God in the finale.

… as the Fisher King of Arthurian Legend and Caelus

If we reverse the meaning of Roy’s name we get “Fisher King,” suggesting the character of Arthurian Legend (also known as the “Wounded King” or “Maimed King”). Brahmin doesn’t encourage reordering names in this manner when translating the JEM, yet it seems applicable given the inclusion of the “White Dragon” noodle bar discussed earlier. Fittingly the Fisher King is the last in a long line of men charged with keeping the Holy Grail, a vessel that grants immortality. Clearly he and the Grail quest in general find a parallel in Roy’s quest for an extended life.

Brahmin argues that “holy vessels” (including the hearth, tent, temple, ark, or house) are symbols of the Aryan vagina or womb in the JEM.[46] If this seems bizarre, note the connection is spelled out directly in the Mesopotamian mythology, where Inanna refers to her vulva as “the Boat of Heaven.”[47] What is a “Boat of Heaven” if not a holy vessel by another name (i.e. a “Holy Grail”)? With this understanding the Holy Grail can be considered another Aryan vaginal symbol. Also note that a wine glass is traditionally smashed during a Jewish wedding ceremony (a symbolic breaking of the hymen, perhaps?). Related to this, it is customary for a newlywed Jewish couple to produce a bloodstained sheet soon after the wedding to prove the bride’s virginity.

Hence it is Roy-as-Fisher King who, as the last man charged with the Holy Grail, loses possession of the Aryan womb to Deckard. Deckard has killed Roy’s two female consorts, so this loss is depicted symbolically as a dove escaping Roy’s grasp (recall that the dove is an avian symbol associated with Aphrodite [Pris] and Venus [Zhora]).

Moreover, Roy’s kneeling death in the finale and the dove’s release conflates the “Wounded King” (as “wounded in the legs or groin, with him unable to stand”) with Caelus’ castration. Here, of course, Deckard-as-Saturn performs the deed from which Venus (as the dove) is “born” or “released” from Roy-as-Caelus.

Roy releases a dove in death. Note the TDK sign in the background; in Hebraic gematria TDK = 114, which corresponds to a Hebrew word meaning “to shed tears, to flow away,” perhaps revealing that Roy’s famous line about memories being lost like tears in rain was not improvised by Rutger Hauer.

… as Adonis and Christ

As mentioned the myth of Dumuzid/Tammuz and Inanna/Ishtar is believed to have directly inspired the story of Adonis and Aphrodite. Thus Roy may also qualify as a god-masked Adonis. His “kingly” name aligns with the Canaanite word ʼadōn (lit. “lord”) which became the Hebrew “Adonai,” from which Adonis takes his name.

In turn Adonis is believed to have inspired the story of Jesus Christ, hence Roy Batty as “King Fisherman” becomes suggestive of Jesus Christ as both “King of Kings” and “Fisher of Men.” This connection between Roy and Adonis/Christ is echoed in their female companions: Venus and Aphrodite find parallels in Mary, who shares the dove and rose as important symbols.

Indeed in some sense the addition of an extra “t” to “Baty” is like Fancher assigning the cross to Roy. Roy quite clearly becomes a Christ figure in the finale when his body undergoes rigor mortis shortly before his expiry date. He succeeds in briefly reviving his fading physical sensations by pushing a nail through the palm of his hand in an echo of Christ’s crucifixion and resurrection. Nothing even remotely like this occurs in the novel. Further, recall that Fancher had introduced a replicant named Mary in an earlier script; presumably she was a veiled Mary/Magdalene figure.

Roy pulls a large nail out of the floorboards and penetrates the palm of his hand in an echo of Christ’s crucifixion.

It is worth remembering that while the puncturing of the hand is a clear reference to Christ, symbolically it may represent something more elemental. After all, it appears the Christ myth is a reference to earlier developed symbolism that is completely opaque to the average person. For example, when Christ’s crucifixion is depicted in the form of a pentagram “the Five Wounds of Christ represented by the pentagram is a reference to ‘sexual union’ with ‘the evening star’ or the Aryan Venus/Ishtar.”[48] In this instance, Roy’s penetration of his palm evokes the stabbing of the Evil Eye of the Hamsa, [49] As the blinding of the Evil Eye can represent phallic destruction and/or the Jewish possession of the Aryan sexual resource, Roy has castrated himself. Perhaps the implication is that he has joinied a celibate priestly class, effectively removing himself from the arena of sexual competition. Here we understand Brahmin when he suggests that Semitic figures, whether Tammuz or Christ, are shepherds presenting their flock with a negative or passive role to follow.

This connection between the vagina and hand is implied when Roy grabs Deckard and breaks two of his fingers as punishment: One for Pris’ life and the other for Zhora’s. Why not a finger for Leon and the other (unknown) replicant(s) killed? Because they were not Roy’s female consorts!

In the end Roy is cleansed of his sins when he saves Deckard’s life in the ultimate act of grace. This allows Roy to achieve inner peace before death, where the Christian’s reward for good deeds and suffering in this life is an eternity in paradise. Of course, the novel ends very differently with Deckard simply shooting Roy.

Pris

The name “Pris” is ultimately derived from the Roman priscus meaning “ancient” and “primordial/primitive.”[50] In turn, she becomes a combination of ancient and primordial female goddesses. In the novel she sneaks into J.R. Isidore’s building unannounced, but in Blade Runner she pretends to be a prostitute down on her luck in order to trick J.F. Sebastian into letting her in. The name “Isidore” literally means “gift of Isis” which may have inspired Fancher to recast Pris as a god-masked Isis, a sacred prostitute figure. In turn, Sebastian becomes Pris’ gift to Roy, as it is through her seduction of Sebastian that Roy obtains his coveted meeting with Tyrell.

In Electric Sheep Pris is merely friends with Roy and his wife Irmgard, yet in Blade Runner Irmgard is discarded and Pris becomes Roy’s lover. Further, she is designated a “leisure/military” model replicant. As a prostitute and the lover of a god-masked Adonis, Pris appears to be a god-masked Aphrodite (the patron goddess of prostitutes). We can be reasonably certain she is not Venus, as that role has been given to Zhora (see below). Incidentially, both Aphrodite and Venus are syncretized with Isis, Inanna, and Ishtar (all Aryan goddesses).

As a nice little touch, Pris’ incept date is Valentine’s day in Blade Runner, befitting a goddess of love. Note the neon blue (Aryan color symbolism) in these shots, as the replicants are introduced.

In Homer’s Iliad Aphrodite is one of Zeus’ daughters, which aligns with Pris being manufactured by Tyrell, whom we take to be a god-masked Zeus/Jupiter. Moreover, Aphrodite was married to Hephaestus but “was frequently unfaithful and had many lovers; in the Odyssey, she is caught in the act of adultery with Ares.”[51] Hence Pris-as-Aphrodite cuckholds her “husband” J.F. Sebastian (a god-masked Hephaestus) by inviting Roy (a god-masked Ares/Mars) into his apartment without his permission. Sebastian is visibly perturbed by this development.

Sebastian is visibly perturbed by Roy’s unexpected arrival. When Roy and Pris kiss, he immediately gets up and interrupts them, announcing he will make breakfast.

… as Mary

Continuing with the theme of prostitution, Pris becomes a Mary Magdalene figure. Writes Brahmin: “Ishtar was also Mary, mother or lover of Christ.”[52] Hence Pris is also compatible with Roy-as-Christ. This likely explains why the Mary character was removed from later scripts, as she was somewhat redundant (besides her name being far too obvious).

Pris is introduced as a street walker wearing a collar necklace of zigzagging triangles, and a tiger-striped gold and black jacket. These are examples of JEM symbolism suggesting she’s a corrupted or Semitized Aryan akin to a “Mary Magdalene” figure.

… as Fortuna Primigenia

As priscus means “primordial” we might also infer that Pris is conflated with Fortuna Primigenia, as Primigenia means “primordial.”[53] Fortuna Primigenia was represented as veiled and blind, akin to Lady Justice. It appears Peoples incorporates these details into Pris’ character, such that she initially hides from Deckard under a veil, and paints a black band of make-up across her eyes as a symbolic blindfold. The latter detail is particularly odd absent this understanding.

In addition, Fortuna Primigenia is believed to be one of Hephaestus’/Vulcan’s lovers which further connects Pris to J.F. Sebastian. Primigenia also came to represent life’s capriciousness, and the name Pris itself relates to the word “caprice.”

Pris paints a symbolic blindfold over her eyes, and hides beneath a veil, details likely inspired by the etymological link between “Pris” and “Fortuna Primigenia.”

… as Prisca of the Montanist movement

Last but not least, Peoples appears to reference Prisca, the “charismatic female prophet of the second century Montanist movement.”[54] The Montanist movement preached that the Holy Spirit could enter the body, causing it to twist and spasm. In Eusebius’ Ecclesiastical History, she’s described as a “pawn of the devil who spoke and acted in ‘a frenzied manner.’”[55] These anecdotes seem to explain Pris’ bizarre, spasmodic death when Deckard shoots her (i.e. he puts the Holy Spirit into her). In Fancher’s earlier script it was Deckard whose body jerked spasmodically after killing Roy (again, all details foreign to the novel).

Incidentally, the Montanist movement was declared heretical by Catholic scholars in the fourth century, who described Prisca and Maximilla as “seductresses.” This description further dovetails with Pris and Zhora as sacred prostitute figures.

Pris screams wildly and thrashes spasmodically in death, like Prisca of the Montanist movement possessed by the Holy Spirit.

Zhora

Fancher appears to recast the android opera singer Miss Luba Luft as the replicant stripper Zhora. “Zhora” is a corruption of “Zohra,” the Arabic name for the planet Venus.[56] This appears to be the intended reading: Outside Zhora’s changing room we see a neon light in the shape of a five-pointed star which relates to Venus as the “evening star” as well as to the “pentagram of Venus” (a.k.a. the “five petals of Venus” or the “dance of Venus”). And inside her room we spy a clam shell decoration on the wall; the scallop shell is one of Venus’ symbols (famously seen in Botticelli’s “The Birth of Venus”).

The five-pointed star marking the entrance to Zhora’s changing room relates to Venus as the “evening star” and/or the “five petals” or pentagram of Venus, while the clam shell decoration evokes one of Venus’ other symbols.

Zhora’s occupation may define her as a god-masked Venus Erycina, whose cult “was considered suitable for ‘common girls’ and prostitutes.”[57] That she’s a freed slave may indicate she is Venus Libertina (“Venus the Freedwoman”). And just as Aphrodite was in an adulterous relationship with Ares, in the Roman tradition Venus would become paired with Mars. Hence she may be Venus Obsequens (“Indulgent Venus”), whose shrine was “supposedly funded by fines imposed on women found guilty of adultery.”[58]

Gaff leaves this effigy of a man in the hotel room where Deckard discovers Zhora’s snake scale. This may relate to Zhora as a god-masked Venus, goddess of love, sex, and desire, or to Roy and Leon as “burnt offerings.”

As Venus is syncretized with Aphrodite, she can be considered coupled with Roy-as-Adonis. And as mentioned earlier, the dove and rose are symbols Venus shares with Mary, so she can also be coupled with Roy-as-Christ.

Speaking of birds, there’s a prominent flamingo decoration in Zhora’s changing room. The flamingo bird’s name literally means “flame-colored,” which may relate to Zhora being a redhead. And according to Wikipedia, “the generic name Phoenicopterus literally means ‘blood red-feathered’” and “Phoeniconaias. . . means ‘crimson red water nymph (or naiad)’,” meanings which may relate to Venus as born from a mixture of Caelus’ blood and sea foam (i.e. the dove released by Roy-as-Caelus when castrated by Deckard-as-Saturn).

… as Demeter/Ceres or Feronia

The name Zhora is itself descended from the Ancient Greek from the element geōrgós ‎(γεωργός) meaning “tilling the ground, fertilizing.” Essentially it means “farmer,” which is an occupational Aryan identifier in the JEM. As a reference to fertile soil it may suggest she’s a goddess associated with agriculture and/or fertility such as Demeter/Ceres.[59] Somewhat like Venus, Demeter/Ceres is a daughter of Saturn. Here, however, the inference may be to Feronia – a goddess who came to be worshipped by farmers – as she was also the patron goddess of slaves. As with Venus Libertina, this esoterically ties into Zhora’s backstory as a freed slave.

… as Salome

Zhora works under the stage name “Miss Salome,” a Biblical figure related to Zhora’s original function as a trained political assassin. Wikipedia states that “in the New Testament, Salome was the stepdaughter of Herod Antipas who demanded, and received, the head of John the Baptist.” John the Baptist is frequently referenced in the JEM naming convention to identify Semitic ciphers, hence Zhora’s stage name foreshadows her attack on Deckard (our Semitic hero). Of course, “John” gets his revenge by retiring “Salome” as she runs for her life.

Zhora attempts to throttle Deckard, true to her stage name “Miss Salome.”

… as “false Eve”

Zhora works at “The Snake Pit” parlor and performs a sex act with an artificial snake as part of her act. Nothing like this occurs in Electric Sheep. She also has a cobra tattooed on the side of her face. Consequently she gives us an allusion to Eve seduced by the serpent in the Garden of Eden. However, just as her snake is artificial, she is an artificial or “false Eve.” As mentioned we know that Rachael – the new-and-improved version of Tyrell’s niece Lilith – is the true Eve of the story. Hence her act and tattoo may simply indicate that she is a Semitized or otherwise corrupted female figure (akin to Hecate/Trivia).

The Snake Pit, Zhora and her snake, Zhora’s snake tattoo, and female mannequins near her murder wearing coils convey Eve and the serpent in the Garden of Eden.

J.F. Sebastian

Fancher renames John Isidore to J.F. Sebastian. As he was originally a John, we can reasonably assume his initials stand for something like “Jean-François,” where both John and Frank are Semitic identifiers in the JEM naming convention (the former stemming from John the Baptist, the latter related to the Frankish motif). Perhaps the initials intentionally obfuscate the colloquial term for a man who patrons prostitutes, as “John” might be a bit on the nose given his relationship with Pris.

In Electric Sheep Isidore was the incompetent and semi-retarded assistant to Hannibal Sloat at the Van Ness Pet Hospital. In Blade Runner he works for Tyrell as a gifted geneticist. And in stark contrast to Isidore’s apartment which is full of “kipple” (junk), Sebastian’s place is overflowing with his fantastic animatronic creations. These are rather significant changes, and they strongly suggest that Sebastian is a god-masked Hephaestus/Vulcan, an inventor and tinkerer. As Vulcan is a volcanic deity closely associated with Yahweh this might explain the new surname, as “Sebastian” (from the Greek sebastos) means “revered.”[60]

Alternatively, the surname may be a reference to Saint Sebastian, who was supposedly shot with arrows but survived. He was rescued and healed by Saint Irene of Rome. Remarkably, Pris’ surname “Stratton” (which goes unmentioned in Blade Runner) means “Roman road” + “enclosure” or “settlement,” a name connecting her with Irene of Rome.

Furthermore in the medieval tradition Saint Sebastian is invoked as a defense against the plague, and it is believed the story Christianizes aspects of Apollo as an archer god who, “at times destroys his enemies by shooting plague-arrows from the heavens, but is also the deliverer from pestilence.”[61] In this case the callback may be an esoteric slight against Apollo, as it implies his plague arrows were unable to kill Saint Sebastian (though perhaps they’re the source of our Sebastian’s illness). Alternatively we might infer that Sebastian escapes Roy-as-Apollo Lycegenes’ murderous rampage, as we never see what actually happens to him.

J.F. Sebastian is greeted by his animatronic “friends”; a bear wearing a Napoleonic uniform and a wind-up soldier. These may represent the French, Russian, and/or Prussian Empires respectively, reduced to mere “playthings” in Jewish hands.

Strangely Sebastian still lives alone in an abandoned apartment building. Why wouldn’t Tyrell provide him accommodations inside the massive corporate headquarters? Perhaps Tyrell-as-Zeus has exiled him from Mount Olympus! We might even infer that Tyrell sleeps in J.F. Sebastian’s old room, as there’s a folding screen behind the former’s bed decorated with cranes (a bird sacred to Vulcan). That Tyrell-as-Zeus has gained the upper hand on Sebastian-as-Vulcan is also implied in their chess game, in which Tyrell is always winning (more on that near the conclusion).

Inside Tyrell’s inner sanctum there’s a folding screen decorated with cranes. Cranes are sacred to Vulcan, so this might suggest that Zeus has exiled Vulcan and taken his place.

Instead of suffering a mentally debilitating radiation poisoning, Sebastian is rapidly aging due to Fancher’s fictitious genetic disorder called the “Methusaleh Syndrome” (Methuselah is the oldest Biblical figure, said to have lived to the age of 969). As such he’s a prime example of the esotericist admitting that Jews are an aged race in need of genetic renewal.[62] That he’s “saturated with years” like Saturn/Cronus indicates a shared ethnicity.[63] Here the dilapidated apartment building echoes his physical deterioration.

As Brahmin has suggested, Jewish esotericists can be complimentary (as they evidently desire admixture with us). Roy asks, “Why are you staring at us, Sebastian?” He replies, “’Cause. . . you’re so different. . . You’re so perfect. What generation are you?” Roy replies Nexus-6, to which Sebastian exclaims, “Ha! I knew it! ‘Cause I do genetic design work for the Tyrell Corporation. There’s some of me in you.”

In Electric Sheep the bullied Isidore empathized with the androids as social outcasts. In Blade Runner, his disorder now mirrors the replicants’ limited lifespan. Further, Sebastian-as-Vulcan was “wounded” or “maimed” and is often depicted sitting in a wheel chair; he’s the mirror image of the “wounded” or “maimed” Roy-as-Fisher King. Also, Vulcan was exiled by Jupiter in the same way Roy-as-Adam was exiled from the Garden of Eden. Thus Sebastian may have been motivated to help Roy as an act of personal revenge. However, Roy apparently kills Sebastian, the lesson being that Jews mustn’t aid Aryan men.

Sebastian surrounded by his creations. Note the large vase in the background, which may represent Vulcan’s cauldron. Possibly it is a volute krater, traditionally placed in the center of a room and used to mix wine and water, with all that that entails in JEM symbolism.

… as Erichthonius, son of Hephaestus/Vulcan

Another intriguing possibility is that Sebastian references Erichthonius, one of Hephaestus/Vulcan’s sons.[64] In this interpretation, Hephaestus/Vulcan has simply been exiled altogether. Erichthonius was born with two serpent’s tails for legs, a kind of genetic deformity in line with Sebastian’s disability. In this case, Peoples may be knowledgeably corroborating Sebastian’s Semitic identity in line with the Serpent motif.[65]

Moreover Sebastian’s disorder relates to Ovid’s description of Erichthonius in Metamorphoses as requiring “new life.” This led the gods to grumble “why others should not be allowed to grant such gifts (the rejuvenating power of the goddess Hebe) . . . Mulciber (Hephaistos) required new life for (his son) Erichthonius.”[66] Additionally Zeus had a friendly relationship with Erichthonius.[67]

Hannibal Chew

Hannibal Sloat, originally a vet at the Van Ness Pet Hospital, is a minor character but one worth examining due to the changes in Blade Runner. The name Hannibal literally means “Baal is gracious,” where the last part of the name refers to Baal, a Semitic deity. Dick probably knew this, so we can guess that Hannibal Sloat is another one of his Jewish ciphers.

To a Jewish esotericist, however, “Hannibal” implies subservience to an Aryan god. Writes Brahmin: “The title Baal appears to be an Aryan identifier. . . equivalent to Jupiter at least to the extent this title appears alone without modifying additional names that may indicate it Semitic.”[68] Thus Hannibal now works for Tyrell-as-Baal/Zeus/Jupiter making replicant eyes at his lab, “Eye World.”

The exterior of Chew’s shop “Eye World” is colored green (a Semitic color) with a red “eye” in its signage.

On its face Hannibal’s new surname seems to be a minor change to better suit the Chinese character actor playing the role. In the Chinese it’s a name related to bows and archers and so doesn’t seem applicable, however the Chinese word “chú” (厨) means “kitchen” and may well describe Chew’s laboratory. In fact “Chew” is an English surname possibly meaning “fish gill.” Perhaps this identifies Chew as Baal/Zeus/Jupiter’s loyal “fish” to be caught by the “King Fisherman” Roy Batty. Notably, the two never meet in the novel.

However there is a far more interesting interpretation of “Chew” as it relates to Hannibal, the famous Carthaginian general. The religion of Carthage was largely based on that of the Canaanites and Phoenicians. There we find a smith, craftsman, engineer, architect, and inventor god similar to Hephaestus/Vulcan yet notably one who was subservient to Baal/Jupiter called Kothar-wa-Khasis. Strikingly, in the Phoenician Greek he was called Chusor. Thus it appears that Fancher took his cue from Dick’s Hannibal but squeezed him into the subtext with a more logical surname and occupation!

As a Smith God Chusor/Kothar could easily be mistaken for Hephaestus/Vulcan. Hence the filmmakers distance Chew from Vulcan’s fiery forge by placing him in an environment of extreme cold. The blue-yellow (Aryan) color symbolism in his laboratory further differentiates Chew from the Semitic Vulcan. Incidentally, Blade Runner has alerted Apollonian artists to a salubrious replacement for Hephaestus/Vulcan should they require such a craftsman in their work: Leave Vulcan in exile and god-mask Kothar/Chusor instead!

The blue-yellow (Aryan) color symbolism in Chew’s laboratory differentiates him from the Semitic Vulcan.

… as Ptah

Significantly, both Chusor and Kothar mean “the Opener” as it relates to Baal’s “window” in the sky through which he sheds his life-giving rain. By extension, this connects Chew to the Egyptian god Ptah, who was also known as “the Opener.” With Ptah it’s a reference to the opening of the mouth, though in Blade Runner it’s a reference to the eye or pupil as Chew specializes in making eyes. Indeed Ptah is a craftsman of bodies; he fashions “the divine bodies of royalty, and the bodies in which dwelt the souls of men in the afterlife.”[69] This relates to Roy’s kingly name as well as his newfound belief in the afterlife.

… as Thoth

The above reading may suffice but the specificity of Hannibal’s occupation seems to indicate yet another layer. In Egyptian mythology we find a god named Thoth who restores Horus’ eye when it is torn out by Set. Horus is a Sky God akin to Baal/Zeus/Jupiter who became associated with the Sun God Ra, hence Chew may be a god-masked Thoth (providing eyes as apparently required by Tyrell-as-Horus). This connection would also relate to Tyrell’s eyes being gouged by Roy (discussed in further detail below).

Gaff

Gaff is another curious character introduced in Blade Runner. The name means “one who made or used iron hooks, or a staff armed with such a hook.” A “hooked staff” might be interpreted as a shepherd’s rod, which is likely the intended reading as shepherd figures appear frequently in the JEM. Indeed, in the German-Jewish criminal lingo of the nineteenth century a crowbar was known as a Rebbmosche (lit. “Rabbi Moses”),[70] no doubt because it superficially resembles the Staff of Moses. This seems to explain why Gaff walks with a cane (i.e. his “shepherd’s rod”).

Related to this, Brahmin writes: “Frequently (the Romans) understood (Hermes/Mercury) as the Prophet Moses himself.”[71] Indeed, it seems as though Gaff rounds out the Greco-Roman subtext as a god-masked Hermes/Mercury – a shepherd, messenger of the gods, and soul guide. Consequently his cane is his caduceus or herald’s staff. As a messenger or herald he serves a summons to Deckard early in the film, effectively issuing what Joseph Campbell terms “The Call to Adventure.”

As a soul guide Gaff can read Deckard’s internal monologue. First he makes a chicken to mock Deckard when he initially balks at the assignment (Deckard’s “Refusal of the Call”), though strikingly the rooster happens to be one of Mercury’s symbols. The matchstick man, as mentioned, appears to reference Venus as a goddess of love or the replicants as “burnt offerings.” The unicorn implies he somehow knows Deckard’s dreams, and simultaneously suggests he approves of Rachael as a rare catch.

Of course, many interpet the unicorn as proof that Deckard is a replicant with implanted memories, but perhaps Gaff is simply a fairy godfather! It bears mentioning that “Gaff” may be a contracted form of “godfather” or “grandfather.” As a beneficent, Moses-like “godfather,” Gaff sets Deckard on his journey and allows him to escape with Rachael in the end.

Gaff walks with a cane, which might be interpreted as a shepherd’s rod or caduceus. He leaves origami figures as messages as if reading Deckard’s innermost thoughts.

Leon Kowalski

In Electric Sheep Sandor Kadalyi/Max Polokov is the Nexus-6 android who injures Holden and attacks Deckard. Fancher replaces him with Leon, though like “Max” this is probably a false name. “Leon” means “lion,” an Aryan animal symbol sometimes applied to Jewish ciphers in the JEM. His surname (seemingly inserted later by Peoples) is taken from the Polish “Kowal” meaning “(black)smith,” and therefore an occupational name associated with Hephaestus/Vulcan. Taken together, the name may be Leon’s unconvincing attempt to conceal his Aryan identity among the Semitic blade runners hunting him (akin to “Luba Luft”).

As mentioned earlier “Sandor Kadalyi” appears to be an anagram, so perhaps so too is “Leon Kowalksi.” In that case the solution is likely “solo weak link,” as Leon does not appear to have an esoteric identity. He’s simply a dumb Aryan male, as implied in his case file as a “combat/loader” with a mental level of “C,” in addition to his occupation as a janitor at the Tyrell Corporation. Another solution might be “kills on awoke,” a programming reference, as he almost gets the better of Holden and Deckard.

When Deckard encounters him on the street Leon reveals he fears his own mortality. Thematically he’s another Aryan in need of Christianity’s promise of an eternal afterlife. Notably it is Rachael who – as deus ex machina – appears just in time to kill Leon and save Deckard’s life. She will soon provide Deckard with the meaning and purpose that Leon lacked.


Additional JEM tropes & symbolism

The Triple Goddess in Blade Runner

Rachael, Pris, and Zhora may represent the Triple Goddess, a common motif in the JEM. As a virgin Rachael is the purest and thus most desirable form of the goddess (Selene). Pris would be the middle form (Artemis/Diana) that is on her way to becoming fully Semitized/corrupted – this is indicated in her occupation and costume. Zhora is the oldest and most Semitized, to the point she engages in bestiality with the snake and has a snake tattoo on her face, becoming the corrupted Persephone or Hecate/Trivia.

Water and blood symbolism in Blade Runner

Following Deckard’s violent altercation with Leon, he and Rachael retire to his apartment. Here Deckard sips a drink causing blood to mix with the clear liquid. He then massages his sore gums over the bathroom sink. This is likely JEM water symbolism – where blood mixing with water represents Semitic-Aryan admixture (see footnote 14) – as it immediately precedes Deckard and Rachael’s first lovemaking, and presumably her deflowering.

Deckard’s shirt is red and blue, JEM color symbolism related to racial admixture. When his blood mixes with his drink, and he washes the blood from his mouth, this is likely JEM water symbolism foreshadowing the love scene that follows.

The Evil Eye and the Blinding motif in Blade Runner

The film shows us a close-up of an eye during its introduction. From there we see the Voight-Kampff actively monitoring Leon’s left eye. Many have commented on the unique glow visible in the replicants’ eyes throughout the film. These allude to the eyes as the “windows to the soul,” but may esoterically convey the Evil Eye. In Jewish and Middle Eastern tradition the Evil Eye – whose pupil is typically blue (and thus Aryan) – is warded off or blinded by the Hamsa charm. Consequently the blinding of the Evil Eye becomes a common motif in the JEM.

There may be three examples of the Blinding motif in Blade Runner. The first is a female bartender who wears an eyepatch over her left eye. The connection between alcohol and blinding is suggestive of the intoxicating wine of Bacchus/Dionysus/Christ. The second is when Roy pushes his thumbs into Tyrell’s eyes while crushing his skull, perhaps an echo of Samson’s blinding. As with Roy pushing a nail through his palm, penetrating a man’s eyes carries sexual connotations suggesting a homoerotic decline or degeneration.

The third example occurs when Roy fights Deckard in the finale. In my experience it is typically a character’s left eye that is blinded in the JEM, hence the streak of blood over Roy’s left eye may subtly suggest his blinding in line with the motif. Here the inference is that Roy has been blinded by Christianity’s promise of an eternal afterlife. A related but less common motif is the deafening of opponents in what might be called something like “the Hamentasch motif.” In the climax Roy’s ear is grazed by a bullet, possibly conveying this.

Left to right: A bartender wears an eyepatch over her left eye. Roy gouges Tyrell’s eyes. And blood runs down the left side of Roy’s face, possibly a subtle example of the Blinding motif.

The Biblical flood and the world of Blade Runner

Blade Runner predicts an America hopelessly divided along racial, cultural, and linguistic lines. Thus it promotes the Jewish mantra of “inevitable diversity,”[72] a fairly common demoralization tactic in the JEM. Los Angeles is unrecognizably American, playing on fears of the “Asian Invasion” that was affecting the automobile and electronics markets of the 1970s and ’80s. Indeed Deckard needs a Japanese chef to translate for Gaff, because the latter speaks a new language that is replacing English as the vernacular. However, he doesn’t seem all that interested in escaping to the “off world colony,” which in the film may be a reference to Israel.

Note that Blade Runner‘s third world conditions are the complete opposite of Electric Sheep‘s barren, lonely, and depopulated Earth. This correlates with Brahmin’s concept of the Biblical flood, Bacchus’ Elysium, and Zion as a time and/or place of racial decadence. Again we note that the Oriental dragons appearing alongside Deckard “traditionally symbolize potent and auspicious powers, particularly control over water, rainfall, typhoons, and floods.”[73] Indeed, we recognize the “flood” of diversity as one weapon in the Jewish arsenal.

Related to this, while Mercerism goes unmentioned, we see what appears to be an Orthodox Jew wandering the crowded streets. It seems the filmmakers wanted to comfort Jews in the audience by letting them know that Judaism persists in the world of the film, particularly as something separate from the androids/replicants. As Brahmin elucidates, Jews view themselves as the “abiding stone” that can weather all challenges, including the Biblical flood.[74]

Mercerism has replaced all other religions in the world of the novel, yet we spy an Orthodox Jewish man in the crowded streets of the film as Deckard hunts for Zhora.

The chess match in Blade Runner

Finally we can discuss an important detail invented for the film: The fateful chess match between Sebastian and Tyrell. Roy picks up where the two left off and sacrifices Sebastian’s queen to win the game. This impresses Tyrell such that he grants access to his inner sanctum. Others have pointed out that this may reference a famous match played in 1851 known as “The Immortal Game.” Scott has stated that any connection is “purely coincidental,” yet the reference would fit the film’s themes perfectly.

Here we find the “eternal duel” between Semite and Aryan. Here we find Jesus Christ outwitting and defeating Zeus/Jupiter through an act of self-sacrifice. Here we find Roy surrendering his Aryan queen to achieve a Pyrrhic victory. And the name of the game itself relates to Roy’s quest for more life. Roy, the Christian convert, is the naive rube who doesn’t realize that Jesus is a recycled version of Tammuz, Dionysus, and Adonis. He has been reduced to a pawn in an age-old race war.


Conclusion

Blade Runner‘s story doesn’t appear to be very sophisticated, but it has been layered in such a way that it is easy to get lost in its web of esoteric symbolism. Indeed it has puzzled critics since its debut, though perhaps Brahmin’s framework has finally solved it. It certainly seems the writers were attempting to confuse or out-do Philip K. Dick, whom we understand was a race-conscious parabolist in his own right. Brahmin notes that there was an uptick in the number of racially and/or politically motivated White authors in the wake of the Second World War (e.g., J.R.R. Tolkien, Robert Heinlein, and Frank Herbert), and Dick appears to fall into this category. Sadly he died before the film was finished, which was rather convenient for the filmmakers.

According to Blade Runner‘s IMDB trivia page, Dick approved of what little he saw of the film – primarily the special effects shots of the city – and the script (it’s unclear which version this is referring to). The latter anecdote seems to be contradicted by his refusal to write the novelization of the movie, a contract worth four hundred thousand dollars. Were the filmmakers hoping that an official novelization of Blade Runner would replace Electric Sheep, and thereby snip its anti-Semitic themes in the bud? And there are two other bits of trivia that stand out:

“(At around one hour, twelve minutes) In the Japanese advertisement shown on the side of a blimp, in which a Geisha-like woman is swallowing a pill, the loud speakers play a line from a Japanese Noh play, saying “Iri hi katamuku”, literally “the setting sun sinks down.” According to special photographics effects supervisor David Dryer, the pills being swallowed are birth control pills.”

Thus the advertisement appears to contain an esoteric message that the Aryan sun is setting as its men and women choose not to have children. Of course, the message of the film is that having children is life’s purpose and the only real form of immortality. And then there’s this knee-slapper:

“Ridley Scott has always maintained that this movie is a piece of entertainment, nothing more. In fact, when he met Philip K. Dick during post-production, he specifically told Dick that he was uninterested in ‘making an esoteric film.’

Mr. Scott doth protest too much, methinks.


Notes and citations

[1] Nicholas Wade, “Studies Show Jews’ Genetic Similarity,” New York Times, June 9, 2010.

ii. William Cobbett suggested that due to intermarriage Jews “have all one and the same face, one and the same pair of eyes, and one and the same nose” in the Political Register of December 6, 1817.

[2] Dick may be referencing a statement given by Walter Bruns while imprisoned at the London Cage – a notorious British prison where P.O.W.s were tortured (the torture did not become public knowledge until years after Electric Sheep had been published). Bruns claimed that “at Riga they first slept with (Jewish women) and then shot them to prevent them from talking.” (Hadding Scott, “Talking Frankly about David Irving,” p.11, CODOH).

[3] Given the novel’s animal-related themes, Dick may be specifically criticizing the Jewish practice of kosher slaughter. Alternatively, he may be criticizing Jews for working with the National Socialists and doing their dirty work, particularly in the ghettos and camps. Or, he may be criticizing the torture of German P.O.W.s (of which there were many firsthand accounts by Americans following the war, e.g. Judge Edward Van Roden’s “American Atrocities in Germany,” The Progressive, February 1949, p. 21f).

[4] Philip K. Dick, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (New York: First Ballantine Books Trade Paperback Edition: 1996), p. 55.

[5] ibid., p.95

[6] ibid., p.150

[7] Seth Rogovoy, “The Secret Jewish History of Blade Runner,” Forward, October 5, 2017

ii. David Desser (1997:114), via A Critical Look at Race and Socio-politics in Two Dystopian Films: Blade Runner (1982) and In Time (2011),” Poison Apple, June 2, 2012

[8] Note that Scott and the screenwriters took an odious ownership of Dick’s work in the years since: Scott is an executive producer on the Amazon adaptation of The Man in the High Castle; Fancher wrote Blade Runner‘s sequel and a pair of shorts; and Peoples wrote Soldier as a “side-quel.” There are several notches on Ridley Scott’s belt that appear to contain JEM. In particular, I would point the reader to Matchstick Men. What could have conceivably attracted him to an otherwise insignificant and mundane character study, other than its JEM? Further commentary is beyond the scope of this essay, but I would encourage anyone studying REM to investigate that book and film for themselves.

[9] M. Brahmin, ibid., book #, chapter: “The Parabolist’s and Propagandist’s Quick Reference Guide for Creating A.I.M.

[10]Sephardi leader Yosef: Non-Jews exist to serve Jews,” Pittsburgh Jewish Chronicle, October 19, 2010

[11] M. Brahmin, ibid., book #, chapter: “Saturn, A form of The Jewish God. Seven, a Reference to Saturn

[12] M. Brahmin, ibid., book #, chapter: “The Promethean and Atlatean: terribly abused and misused words

[13] M. Brahmin, ibid., book #, chapter: “The Infamy of Crete Part I: the Problem of Being ‘European’

[14] M. Brahmin, ibid., book #, chapter: “Baptism and Anointing: Symbols for Copulation and Sexual Interaction

[15] M. Brahmin, ibid., book #, chapter: “Names Part II: The Importance of Names in REM, Common names & Exoteric Alibis

[16]Deckard: Baby Name of the Day,” Appellation Mountain, January 14, 2016

[17] Tacitus, Histories 5.4

ii. Note, however, that names meaning “stranger” probably indicate an Aryan cipher in JEM as the Modern Hebrew word, נוֹכרִי, means “alien,” “stranger” but also “gentile.”

[18] M. Brahmin, ibid., book #, chapter: “Circumcision, Saturn, Kumarbi, Foreskins & the Human Gelding

[19] M. Brahmin, ibid., book #, chapter: “Saturn, A form of The Jewish God. Seven, a Reference to Saturn

[20] M. Brahmin, ibid., book #, chapter: “Garden of Eden Part II: The Jewish Serpent & Jewish Tree of Knowledge

[21] M. Brahmin, ibid., book #, chapter: “Arthurian Legend as Deleterious Myth

[22] Watch “The Epic of Gilgamesh,” a lecture by Andrew George, or for a shorter version “The Epic of Gilgamesh: Crash Course World Mythology #26

[23] See the Ouroboros tattoo in Annihilaton for another example of its use in JEM.

[24] M. Brahmin, ibid., book #, chapter: “The Color Green, Robin Hood & May Day

[25] M. Brahmin, ibid., book #, chapter: “‘Blood Magic’ in Plant Color Symbolism: the Rose, the Holly and the Mistletoe

[26] M. Brahmin, ibid., book #, chapter: “The Bride Gathering Cult Part VI: Jewesses as ‘Hated’ ‘Leah’ and Auxiliary Women

[27] See also Rachel Amber, a god-masked Persephone, in Life is Strange.

[28] M. Brahmin, ibid., book #, chapter: “The ‘Neg-ing’ Jewish Husband and the Christian Wife

[29] M. Brahmin, ibid., book #, chapter: “The Garden of Eden Part I: Adam the Aryan Cuckold

[30] M. Brahmin, ibid., book #, chapter: “Captain Marvel Part III: Carol Danver’s love interest, Mar Vell, the Christian Crypto-Jew

[31] M. Brahmin, ibid., book #, chapter: “The Racial Identity of Christ’s Parents Part II: The Annunciation Proof

[32] See Brahmin’s take on “owls” in the comments of “Esoteric Apollo: The Crow or Raven, Symbol of Racial Cuckoldry

[33] M. Brahmin, ibid., book #, chapter: “Names Part II: The Importance of Names in REM, Common names & Exoteric Alibis

[34] M. Brahmin, ibid., book #, chapter: “The Martial and the Apollonian

[35] See “Adam the red,” M. Brahmin, ibid., book #, chapter: “The Garden of Eden Part I: Adam the Aryan Cuckold

[36] Iddin-Dagan A 169-172, The Melammu Project

[37] P. Kyle McCarter, Harvad Theological Review, Volume 66: “The River Order in Israelite Literature” (Charlottesville, VA.: University of Virginia), October 1973

[38] James Hastings, Encyclopædia of Religion and Ethics, Vol. 12, Suffering – Zwingli (Edinburgh: T&T Clark), p.189

ii. There is some dispute over Dumuzid’s connection to Tammuz. Dumuzid the Fisherman is now believed to be the fourth king of the first Dynasty of Uruk and Gilgamesh’s predecessor.

[39] ibid.

[40] M. Brahmin, ibid., book #, chapter: “The Bride Gathering Cult Part II: The Origin of the Semitic Bride Gathering Cult called Judaism

[41] Dumuzid, Wikipedia

[42] Coraciidae, Wikipedia

[43] Dumuzid and Ĝeštin-ana, The ETCSL project, Faculty of Oriental Studies, University of Oxford

[44] At one point Roy smashes his head through a wall, breaking checkerboard tiles in the process. Possibly this detail relates to the checkerboard floors seen in Masonic symbolism, suggesting a “mad king” at odds with the secret society. Though which king is being referenced here is beyond me.

[45] M. Brahmin, ibid., book #, chapter: “Esoteric Apollo: the totem of Wolf as pseudo-praise

[46] M. Brahmin, ibid., book #, chapter: “Nuns, Vestal ‘Virgins’ and Aryan Lioness as ‘Altar-Hearth’

[47]See passage no. 4, The Courtship of Inanna and Dumuzi, K. Dickson, Comparative Mythology: Near Eastern, Myths of Inanna 1 (Sumer)

[48] For more on the crucifix as copulation with Venus, see M. Brahmin, ibid., book #, chapter: “The X-Rated Crucifix

[49] M. Brahmin, ibid., book #, chapter: “The Micro-aggressing ‘Evil Eye,’ the Hamsa, the ‘mark’ and the third eye

[50] Priscilla, Wikipedia

[51] Aphrodite, Wikipedia

[52] M. Brahmin, ibid., book #, chapter: “Etymology, mythography and the ‘Promethean transmission’

[53] Fortuna, Wikipedia

[54] Prisca, Wikipedia

[55] ibid.

[56] Compare with Zoran Lazarević as a reference to the Morning Star in Uncharted 2.

[57] Thomas A. J. McGinn, Prostitution, Sexuality, and the Law in Ancient Rome, Oxford University Press, 1998, p.25.

[58] Staples, Ariadne, From Good Goddess to vestal virgins: sex and category in Roman religion, Routledge, 1998, p. 89.

[59] Compare with Chloe in Life is Strange, Josie Radek in Annihilation, and Chloe in Deep Impact.

[60] M. Brahmin, ibid., book #, chapter: “Vulcan as an Important Form of the Lesser God

[61] Saint Sebastian, Wikipedia

[62] M. Brahmin, ibid., book #, chapter: “The Apollo Cult

[63] M. Brahmin, ibid., book #, chapter: “Saturn, A form of The Jewish God. Seven, a Reference to Saturn

[64]Hephaistos family,” Theoi

[65] M. Brahmin, ibid., book #, chapter: “Garden of Eden Part II: The Jewish Serpent & Jewish Tree of Knowledge

[66] Ovid, Metamorphoses 9. 420 ff

[67] Erichthonius, Wikipedia

[68] M. Brahmin, ibid., book #, chapter: “Red herrings in Leviticus and Moloch as example of Jewish ‘Projection’

[69] Ptah, Egyptian Gods

[70] J. Keller and Hanns Andersen, The Jew as Criminal (translated by R. Belser), p 13.

[71] M. Brahmin, ibid., book #, chapter: “Mercury: The Philosopher, Priest, Prophet, Apostle, Wizard and Deceiver

[72] M. Brahmin, ibid., book #, chapter: “The Promotion of ‘Inevitable Diversity’: An Ancient Pattern

[73] Chinese dragon, Wikipedia

[74] An Egyptian television series called “The End” sparked uproar in Israel in May 2020 for depicting a “post-Israel” vision of the future. It just goes to show how sensitive and hypocritical Jews are when it comes to ethnic demoralization when they’re the targets.